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Unusual Restrooms

While a utilitarian feature, the toilet’s very nature inspires countless jokes and, in public spaces, forces us to ponder concepts like privacy and cleanliness. From restaurants and grocery stores to hotels and museums, establishments around the world have embraced the humor and –dare we say hidden glamour? – of the toilet, and made it a can’t-miss feature.


Sketch restaurant in London answers the call of nature with works of art (via www.agirlastyle.com).


Don’t be disturbed if you see more than one person coming out of these Port-O-Lets at Jungle Jim’s International Market (via www.junglejims.com).




Would you take care of business in a public place? This toilet is encased in one-way mirrored glass to render the user invisible (via http://www.sinbadesign.com).


How about a refreshing sip from a urinal, or a delicious bite from the toilet? (via http://edibleblog.com)


The ladies’ room at this Japanese restaurant features an unexpected amenity(via http://www.okeanosgroup.com).

Here are a few of the most outlandish, over-the-top and downright fun toilet destinations from around the world.

Pee in a pod?

Sketch restaurant in London is designed to be an opulent celebration of food, art and music. Located in a converted 18th-century building, it actually features three separate restaurant experiences, each with its own décor.

So perhaps it only makes sense that the restrooms – accessible through the art gallery – have a vibe all their own. This all-white, glossy room, with dramatic, futuristic lighting, features toilets that are individually housed in egg-shaped pods not unlike the extraterrestrial craft from the late-1970s sitcom “Mork & Mindy.”

A Port-O-Let surprise

At Jungle Jim’s International Market in Fairfield, Ohio, the eccentric owner delights grocery shoppers with a functioning parking lot tram, full-size palm trees and massive talking mascots from various food brands, not to mention a selection of hard-to-find specialty items from around the world.

But he has one more surprise up his sleeve, for those who need to use the facilities during their shopping trip. Several Port-O-Lets have been recommissioned as entrances for the men’s and women’s restrooms. The stalls open to large, modern restroom facilities – with jungle-themed décor, of course.

Not for the meek

There’s another exhibit to behold in London that’s not far from the historic Tate Britain Museum. And like other great works of art, this one might make you a bit uncomfortable.

Enclosed by one-way mirrored glass, the public toilet allows the user to watch the hubbub of the busy street without allowing passersby to see beyond their own reflections – even if their noses are pushed against the glass. Titled "Don’t Miss A Sec," the installation byartist Monica Bonvicini was meant to challenge the ideas of privacy – and it certainly seems to do just that. The loo reportedly draws plenty of attention, but not as many takers.

To eat or to pee?

Most people don’t imagine eating out of a toilet or drinking from a urinal, but the folks at Modern Toilet Restaurant did that and more, turning it into a chain of successful restaurants.

First opened in 2004 as the Marton Restaurant in Taiwan, the restaurants feature restroom-themed décor and nonfunctioning toilets as chairs. The dining experience is not for the faint of heart, as the meals – which have particularly unappetizing names –are served in mini toilets, and drinks come in urinal-shaped glasses.

Pee with the fishes

At Mumin Papa Café in Akashi, Japan, the ladies’ restroom may attract as many tourists as the food.

The stall is built into an aquarium, allowing users to admire schools of brightly colored fish as they take care of business. It’s been said, however, that the sea turtle enjoys watching visitors, so shy visitors be warned.

 

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